Posts Tagged: WWI

Flu Pandemic Claims a WWI Soldier from Ohio

This is another installment in my ongoing WWI research to commemorate America’s Centennial of entering the War in 1917. “To Appear Saturday” read the headline on page 9 in the Hutchinson News for Tuesday, 16 Jul 1918. The Reno County, Kansas, newspaper was reporting that local men had been notified to appear for physical examinations: Thirty-three

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Researching Frank Morley Green’s WWI Service

  Frank Morley Green was my first cousin, once removed. He was born on 11 Jan 1896 in Pierpont, Ashtabula County, Ohio, when his father, Edwin Green, was 23 and his mother, Nellie White Green, was 20. As a child, I and my family often visited his home in Andover, and he and his wife

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World War I Research: Training Millions of Soldiers

With the 100th anniversary of America’s entry into The Great War (aka World War I) fast approaching, I have begun doing some research on events leading up to the war, training of troops, and the service of blood and shirt-tail relatives. On April 6, 1917, “two days after the U.S. Senate voted 82 to 6

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Burned Records — The “B-file”

As genealogy researchers, we have often heard the statement, “The records were burned.” The statement usually involves the records that should be on file in a courthouse. But there is another type of record search that often gets that response: Army records from WWI and WWII. That’s because in July 1973, a disastrous fire broke out

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