Books

She Was Listed in Outstanding Young Women of America 1971

The other day I did some more cleaning and organizing of “things” around the house. I came across the book Outstanding Young Women of America, 1971. I had forgotten about this volume and the entry for Mary Jane (MJ), my late wife. Here is how the publishing organization describes the volume: “The Outstanding Young Women of

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Evaluate Those Hints from Ancestry.com

Yesterday, I received via Ancestry.com’s messaging service an email from a cousin. Here’s what she said: Hi Wally, I started my family tree on Ancestry.com, but am not sure of the best way to balance info vs. privacy. Also what is the protocol for entering female’s names…maiden vs. married. Also, from hints I am finding

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James S. Morley, An Important Collateral Relative

James S. Morley was not a blood relative, but he was very important to my family’s history. He and his wife, Jennie, raised my Grandma Grace as their adoptive daughter from the time she was orphaned at about age four, hence the somewhat tenuous collateral relationship. James Selby Morley died on the 6 Jun 1900

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Thank You Ancestry.com for Andover (Ohio) School Yearbooks

The other day I learned that Andover School, my elementary and high school alma mater, published a yearbook for 1928. I was doing a routine search on Ancestry.com for my grandmother Grace Darling Dingman/Tripp/Stafford (born Green; adoptive name  Morley). I was searching specifically for Grace Tripp. At the time, she was married to–but separated from–John James

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The Mystery of Hiram Oliver Dingman

What happened to Hiram Oliver Dingman, my great uncle born in Sandy Creek Township, Mercer County, Pennsylvania? Using Ancestry.com (which I used for most the the research described herein), he is easy to track through 1860 when he was 12 years old, living in the household of his father, Nelson Dingman, in Salem Township, Mercer County,

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Brother of Detective Was Named Evert

I just finished reading The Dying Detective, by Swedish crime writer Leif G.W. Persson  (translated by Neil Smith into British English). This novel is a police procedural without much dramatic action–a subset of crime fiction that I actually prefer. The story required 454 pages from start to finish, but I found that it went quickly. It is set

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Book about 10th Mountain Div in WWII May Become a Movie

While poking around on the Internet with Google, I learned about a project that Robert Redford apparently is working on: creating a movie based on the book Climb to Conquer, The Untold Story of WWII’s 10th Mountain Division, written by Peter Shelton and published by Simon and Schuster in 2003 (http://books.simonandschuster.com/Climb-to-Conquer/Peter-Shelton/9781451655100) . In late June and early

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Learning About Another Country, South Africa, and its Dutch Origins

I enjoy reading detective novels. And I especially enjoy them when they introduce me to another region, country, or culture. I have just finished reading Cobra, A Novel, written by Deon Meyer. This fast-paced detective novel provides an introduction to modern-day South Africa. The author wrote it  originally in Afrikaans, a language that has evolved from

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Three Kellerman Mystery Writers Featured at Book Fair

Last evening, I attended a session featuring Jonathan, Faye, and Jesse Kellerman at the opening event of the Book Fair Month at the Mandel Jewish Community Center in Beachwood. The event required me to pay a fee of $20 as a JCC non-member for the one-hour discussion by the three Kellermans about their books and

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